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Climate change and the problem with time | Penn Today

Climate change and the problem with time

Episode 7 of ‘In These Times’ brings together an oceanographer, a geophysicist, and a historian about the challenges to understanding the Earth’s 4.6 billion year history, and how our actions in the present impact a future we can only imagine.

Season three of OMNIA’s “In These Times” podcast, titled Fear and Loathing and Science, explores scientific ideas that cause big reactions in a world full of polarization, politics, misrepresentation, and simple misunderstanding.

Hand-drawn images of charts and graphs and waves, measuring global rise in temperatures and sea levels.

Episode seven brings together an oceanographer, a geophysicist, and a historian to talk about the challenges to understanding the Earth’s 4.6 billion year history, and how our actions in the present impact a future we can only imagine.

It is an episode about big things. Big like the ocean, which, thanks to its size, absorbs about 30% of all CO2 emissions. Big like the scale of our Earth’s 4.6 billion history, and big like our responsibility to future generations. Can an understanding of and appreciation for the size of our world and the scope of its history, from the beginning of time to dinosaurs to humans, help us take action against climate change and engage in acts of care for the future of our planet and its inhabitants? Irina Marinov, associate professor of earth and environmental science, Jane E. Dmochowski, senior lecturer in earth and environmental science, and Jared Farmer, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History, all in the School of Arts & Sciences, are featured.




Episode 7 of “In These Times” brings together an oceanographer, a geophysicist, and a historian about the challenges to understanding the Earth’s 4.6 billion year history, and how our actions in the present impact a future we can only imagine.
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